Category: 1995

Lush Karma, 1995

Perfumer unknown. Most of us can state the first part of the law of inertia.  It’s one of the few bits of science that pierces pop-culture.  But then again, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. A body at rest….  A body in motion.  The caveat is what we tend to forget to mention.  Rest/motion unless acted upon by an…

Serge Lutens Fleurs d’Oranger, 1995

(image Gina Lollabrigida) Perfumer Christopher Sheldrake I imagine that for simplicity’s sake, Lutens put the names of three flowers highlighted in this perfume, orange blossom, jasmine and tuberose on separate slips of paper and randomly pulled orange blossom out of a hat. Each heady note could be accused of upstaging a perfume, so combined, Fleurs d’Oranger should be the the…

Versace Blonde, 1995

Perfumer Nathalie Feisthauer I’ve railed against the soliflor before (see Fracas) but I must stand up for Blonde.  I blind-bought the extrait and was surprised to find the closest thing to tuberose flower I’ve ever smelled out of a bottle.  It perfectly captures a Philip Glass-like cycle of flower, bitterness, sweetness, rottenness.  The extrait holds close to the skin after…

Amouage Ubar, 1995

Perfumer Créations Aromatiques. Look at the cast of any of the Bravo housewives at a post-season reunion. Consider the degree of wardrobe, hair, make-up and custom-spanx before your eyes. What is the difference between this execution of gender and drag?  Physiological sex distinctions seem minor. The issue is the extremity of the presentation.  If what you see on those reunion…

Annick Goutal Sables, 1995

Perfumer Annick Goutal Sables follows a classical drydown arc: top, heart, basenotes. The real trick though is that is that it takes you from one genre to another over this progression. Starting with immortelle dissolved in amber, Sables gives you either a strictly sweet maple syrup candy, or a sweet and savory curry with fenugreek and raisins. It’s up to…