Category: Serge Lutens

Summer Fun(k) or Persephone’s props.

  (image by Arlene Gottfried) Fresh, effervescent perfumes offer relief from the heat, a respite from the sultriness of the summer season. Eaux de Cologne, aquatics, light fruity fragrances, leafy/grassy green perfumes, airy mixed-florals. These usual suspects accessorize the fleshy displays of the season. They contribute to the cleanliness/godliness illusion of skin. My skin puts the lie to this fiction.…

Serge Lutens Fille en Aiguilles, 2009

  (image source unknown) Perfumer Christopher Sheldrake I’m from a small town in Connecticut. Not, Suburban-New-York-Connecticut. New-England-Connecticut. In my 1960s-1970s, the New England countryside was a place of wonder and democracy. The woods were a frame of mind as much as they were a location. Though I never thought of anything local as particularly exotic, pine was the scent of local…

Serge Lutens Bois et Fruits, 1992

Perfumer Christopher Shledrake The truth of Bois et Fruits, and the other spin-offs of Féminité du Bois as well, is hidden in plain sight in their names.  Bois de/et (insert note). Variation, exploration, overdosage.  The truth of the matter is, they are flankers.  The upside is that they demonstrate that a flanker isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The first thing…

Serge Lutens la Fille de Berlin, 2012

Perfumer Christopher Sheldrake The Serge Lutens line is known for the heavy and the heady.  Apart from the nouvelle orientals, Féminité du Bois, Bois de Violette, and the others in the Bois series, there are two styles that capture a large portion of the line. Perfumes like Ambre Sultan, Cuir Mauresque, and Chergui fall into a range of amber, wood…

Serge Lutens un Bois Vanille, 2003

(Image from Robert Franks’s Cocksucker Blues.) Mick and Keith. Serge and Chris. Vanilla is a key component to both the contemporary dessert/gourmand and the classic amber oriental. Vanilla is almost inescapable in perfumery, but it’s usually found in the familiar company of labdanum, balsams, resins, spices or ethylmaltol in the above genres. It takes effort to dissociate it from the…

Serge Lutens Fleurs d’Oranger, 1995

(image Gina Lollabrigida) Perfumer Christopher Sheldrake I imagine that for simplicity’s sake, Lutens put the names of three flowers highlighted in this perfume, orange blossom, jasmine and tuberose on separate slips of paper and randomly pulled orange blossom out of a hat. Each heady note could be accused of upstaging a perfume, so combined, Fleurs d’Oranger should be the the…