Category: le Labo

le Labo Patchouli 24, 2006

Perfumer Annick Ménardo A review of le Labo Patchouli 24, a salute to Bvlgari Black and, I suppose, a fan letter to Anick Ménardo. If I find a genre of perfume that I like, I embrace it. I stock up. With Patchouli 24, I’ve cornered the market on the smokey-leather-tea-patchouli-resinous-vanilla genre. I already own two others in the category:  Bvlgari…

le Labo Labdanum 18, 2006

Perfumer Maurice Roucel Cistus labdanum is a classic amber material. It’s THE classic amber, in fact. It has many facets and can be used to tease perfumes into an endless number of shapes. I had hoped that le Labo’s spartan approach would lead to interesting results. Unfortunately, Labdanum 18 emphasizes almost exclusively the cloying angles of the material. It starts…

le Labo Ylang 49, 2013

  Perfumer Frank Voelkl Le Labo, in their ongoing conflation of ingredient lists and titles, have made a great contribution to the reinvention of the chypre. It’s easy to misunderstand the chypre, focussing on the surface or its list of ingredients (bergamot, oakmoss, labdanum) rather than its complexity and balanced tension. Trying to create a new chypre by replacing banned…

le Labo Calone 17

I don’t use room sprays, so when I smell them they feel a bit like ham-fisted perfumes. Calone 17 is a floral-aquatic scent that screams “flower & water!” at you.  Imagine Annick Goutal’s un Matin d’Orage at volume 20.  In a perfume, indolic notes and such provide the backdrop for the sweetness and light.  I suspect that in a room…

le Labo Iris 39, 2006

Perfumer Frank Voelkl Where iris root tends toward the powdery in many perfumes, in Iris 39 it’s a cold, tingling, green, papery dust. It comes off as dry but tacky like rosin. Iris 39 focuses on the conciseness of iris. If iris root were a manner of speaking it would read as follows: Declarative statement. (“Declarative statement, pause, full stop”)…