Category: l’Artisan Parfumeur

l’Artisan Parfumeur Rose Privée, 2015

Stéphanie Bakouche’s sensational Invasion Barbare for Parfums MDCI is a hard act to follow, and it’s worth considering that early-career success is not without its downside. The expectation following a Luca Turin 5-star rating of a first perfume is stratospheric. Rose Privée is Backouche’s second perfume, released a full ten years after Invasion Barbare and co-authored by Bertrand Duchaufour, cited…

Duchaufour’s Duet: l’Artisan Parfumeur Timbuktu and Dzongkha

Bertrand Duchaufour lead the trend of woody-smoky perfumes in the late 90s and the 00s, particularly with his perfumes for l’Artisan Parfumeur and Comme des Garçons. He became known for the genres that his work redefined: translucent incenses, sheer vetiver, weightless woods. Seen from the present, the significance of Duchaufour’s work is better understood by looking at his style and…

l’Artisan Parfumeur Passage d’Enfer, 1999

(image The Confabulous Flag) Perfumer Olivia Giacobetti I’ve recently found my way to Giacobetti’s work, and I am fascinated. I still want to investigate her fig and flower perfumes, but having experienced Dzing! Passage d’Enfer, Safran Troublant and Fou d’Absinthe, I’m sold. I love the scents of the perfumes that I’ve tried, but I am drawn to her for her artistic…

l’Artisan Parfumeur Safran Troublant, 2002

Perfumer Olivia Giacobetti Olivia Giacobetti has a knack for making novel perfumes that surprise but don’t shock. They are unexpected, but perfectly coherent when you think about them. The sweet and salty hay of Dzing! The smoked-lily soap of Passage d’Enfer. It’s a delicious way of changing our reality.  The trick is neither fantastical nor over-the-top. She gives us something…

l’Artisan Parfumeurs Jour de Fete, 2004

(image, Norwegian Wood) Perfumer Olivia Giacobetti Olivia Giacobetti’s has a knack for asking questions with her perfumes. Even when the questions simply have to do with olfactory dynamics, they seem to have implications beyond the matter at hand. Suggestive, almost allegorical value. What is the difference between quiet and soft in a perfume? Is low sillage an advantage or a…

l’Artisan Parfumeur Traversée du Bosphore, 2010

Perfumer Bertrand Duchaufour In the wrong hands this perfume might just have been an exercise. How do you take a food known as much for its texture and viscosity and make its scent appear out of thin air? Turkish delight doesn’t have the effusive quality of many other food scents. Think of a piece loukhoum as a planet. The aroma…

l’Artisan Parfumeur Coeur de Vetiver Sacré, 2010

  Perfumer Karin Vichon Coeur de Vetiver Sacre is a Vetiver fragrance the way an avocado is a fruit: technically, but not so much characteristically. I’ve seen comparisons of Vetiver Sacre to other vetivers, from Maitre Parfumeur’s Route du Vetiver to Chanel’s Sycomore. If replication of a pure vetiver note is your standard, Vetiver Sacre bombs. But so would Guerlain…

l’Artisan Parfumeur Mure et Musc Extreme, 1993

Perfumer unknown (original Mure et Musc by Jean-François Laporte) The fruity floral isn’t my bag. There are a few exceptions to this habit, notably the intoxicating Badgley Mischka. I’m not starved for fruit, though. Eau de Cologne, which starts and ends with hesperedic notes, is by definition fruity, and it’s hard to dislike eau de cologne. Otherwise there are three…