Category: Frédéric Malle

Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle Portrait of a Lady, 2010

Perfumer Dominique Ropion. The rose and patchouli pairing is such a good fit that it seems like proof of fate. It’s been the basis for a range of leathery, ambery, woody and mossy perfumes spanning woody-floral, chypre and oriental genres. The Malle PR boasts that Ropion used surpassing doses of rose essence and patchouli coeur, a fractionated patchouli. Fractionated naturals…

Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle Une Fleur de Cassie, 2000

Perfumer Dominique Ropion Ropion knows how to make monster florals. Ysatis, Amarige, Alien. Jarring and disturbing to some, ravishing to others. (Count me in the disturbed category.) The key is in the synth-natural play of Ropion’s aesthetic. Take Amarige and Alien (co-authored with Laurent Bruyère). They are considered versions of the soliflor yet to my nose they are so unequivocally…

Editions Parfums de Frédéric Malle Dans tes Bras, 2008

Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle launched in 2000 with a rock-star lineup of perfumers, including Maurice Roucel, who composed the culty Musc Ravageur for the brand. Art direction and commissioning independent perfumers was nothing new in 2000. In fact, it was the founding model of niche perfumery. Early examples Diptyques (1961), l’Artisan Parfumeurs (1976), Maitre Parfumeur et Gantier (1988) were…

Frédéric Malle Vetiver Extraordinaire, 2002

(image Randolph Scott and Cary Grant) Perfumer Dominique Ropion. Vetiver root has been used in perfumery since day one, but the eponymous masculine Vetivers fixate on it with a particular reverence. Vetiver isn’t simply the masculine equivalent of the feminine white floral. It’s become a ceremonial totem of male toiletry, ranking with the fougère as a masculine olfactory reference. In the late…

Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle Musc Ravageur, 2000

(image source unknown) Perfumer Maurice Roucel. Wearing L de Lolita could well be a Catholic-school lesson on the sin of gluttony and the threats of eternal hell. The anticipation draws you close, the titilation makes you give in, the satisfaction is the pleasure you’ve been denied. Then you continue to eat, unable to control yourself, long past the point of nausea…

Frédéric Malle le Parfum de Thérèse, 2000

  It’s interesting to see the comparisons between Dior Diorella, Dior Eau Sauvage and Frédéric Malle Parfum de Therèse.  Diorella seems like the logical successor to Eau Sauvage. Riskier, less seemly than Eau Sauvage, it still came from the same principles and intentions of composition.  Parfum de Thérèse seems overall a little further from Eau Sauvage, a bit less similar in composition and…