Category: Bond no 9

Bond no 9 Chez Bond, 2003

(Perfumer not identified.)  How does the expression go?  First impressions are lasting impressions?  Something like that. In 2003 Bond’s launch strategy included a few easy, recognizable perfumes.  Perfumes Bond gambled on tapping into a built-in audience appeal.  Previously, the niche perfume tactic was to launch with one or two perfumes and build a line over time, but Bond were one…

Bond no 9 Chinatown, 2008

Perfumer Aurélien Guichard Chinatown is a floral, fruity chypre of the new school.  It could easily fall into other categories (gourmand, fruity-floral, floriental) but I see this all-things-to-all-noses bit as a tribute to the creative wealth of the chypre genre.  The opening of Chinatown gives it all to you.  Flower (indoles from orange blossom,) fruit (peachy plum) bitterness (oakmoss) resin…

Bond no 9 New York Patchouli, 2013

Perfumer not cited. With Bond’s vintage subway token  logo and their real-estate-porn-style of naming their products, brand identity is unmistakeable. Bond attempt to balance exclusivity/ubiquity à la Vuitton and their products carry the same dissonance as an LV-logo bag.  They express a desire for exclusivity in a manner that guarantees visibility and readability à la Big Mac. Bond no 9 started as the…

Bond no 9 New York Musk, 2012

Perfumer unknown. Wonderful start! New York Musc opens smelling like you would imagine a dry cleaned cactus. Prickly, and dry, giving a tactile impression like the tacky feel of drying varnish. It’s a beautifully constructed synthetic musk; not cuddly, not sweet, but also not like detergent. It feels deliberate and even insubordinate. This isn’t your mama’s musk. It’s got that New…

Bond no 9 Coney Island, 2007

Perfumer Michel Almairac You can recognize a classic Guerlain when you come across it.  Same goes for Caron, Estée Lauder, Montale, Amouage. It might be a similarity of style, it might be recognizeable notes.  It’s a sort of calling card. Recognition is the first step in branding, and most up-and-coming houses seek brand identifiability. Christ, did Bond no. 9 choose the…

Bond no 9 Sag Harbor, 2012

Perfumer Laurent le Guernec I’ve sampled a couple dozen of the Bond no 9 perfumes.  There is a sameness to their mixed floral perfumes that concerns me.  They smell the same, yes.  That’s the subjective part.  But I recognize that I dislike their sweetened-floral fragrances in general, and I must question how this colors my judgement.  Dislike aside, to look…

Bond no 9 Manhattan, 2012

Perfumer Claude Dir Bond no 9 have set of ‘bad penny’ notes. They are identifiers and if they were pleasant, they’d be considered signature notes, like Guerlinade. They seem to fall within a gourmand, oriental, woody ambery range. They have an unsettling quality of hitting  a point in your head, toward the back of your sinuses, that feels like a crossroads…